Etiopie

Ethiopia: Emergency Preparedness & Response

The unstable Horn of Africa has been regularly plagued by droughts due to fluctuations in the quantity of rainfall per annum. Humanitarian crises not only affect the inhabitants of the northern and south-eastern parts of the country; Ethiopia also faces an influx of thousands of refugees from neighbouring Somalia.

For instance, the crisis of 2011, which affected more than 12.4 million people, resulted from the lack of regular rainfall, rising prices of basic food and products, and conflicts in neighbouring countries. People in Need helped local herdsmen who had lost their herds, and war refugees from neighbouring Somalia.

The main focus of our organization is humanitarian assistance in the form of food security, shelter and renovation, and health care, as well as the development of sources for drinking water and the provision of alternative training courses.

Rapid humanitarian intervention is mainly intended for the worst affected areas in the south and south-eastern parts of Ethiopia. People in Need offers humanitarian assistance in current crises; however, we also try to prevent future turmoil by offering effective humanitarian aid with local partners. An example of such is the successful aversion of an imminent cholera epidemic in South Omo, which took place in 2011.

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Ongoing aidORPast aid programmes

Immediate assistance to the internally displaced population in Konso, South Omo and other areas of the SNNP, Oromia and Sidama regions

Immediate assistance to the internally displaced population in Konso, South Omo and other areas of the SNNP, Oromia and Sidama regions

Political instability and ethnic armed conflicts in neighboring regions have displaced hundreds of thousands of people in the SNNP region during the past few years. People fleeing violence often have to travel hundreds of kilometers, by leaving they possessions and agricultural land behind, they lose their only source of livelihood. Refugees in host communities often make up the same proportion as the host population which puts more pressure on farmland. Due to the growing population, access to clean water is not sufficient, most people have to walk several kilometers to have water from untreated water resources, such as lakes and rivers. Thus, diseases related to poor hygiene are spreading across the area. These limited resources are threaten even more during droughts. Refugees come without any means, they live without shelter in places that do not provide them with basic protection or minimal hygienic and sanitation conditions.

People in Need helps to improve the living conditions of some 200,000 internally displaced people through access to drinking water and the provision of shelter. Thanks

to the project, wells, latrines and hand washing facilities will be (re)constructed, a water storage system will be introduced and health staff will be trained for its management and maintenance. Households will be provided with hygiene kits, shelter kits (rope, tarpaulin) including bedding and kitchet set. An awareness campaign will be organized, health volunteers will be in regular contact with households, bringing key health and hygiene information to a wide range of people.

Emergency Basic Needs Support to Conflict Affected Populations in Tigray and Amhara

Emergency Basic Needs Support to Conflict Affected Populations in Tigray and Amhara

Since November 2020, civil war has been ongoing in the Tigray region in the north of Ethiopia. Troops loyal to the regional government are fighting the federal army, with other armed actors involved on both sides of the conflict. The conflict has affected not only the Tigray region, but also the neighbouring regions of Amhara and Afar. According to current estimates (2022), 6.7 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance, of which 1.7 million are at risk of catastrophic famine. Since the beginning of the conflict, population displacement has been ongoing, with at least 2.1 million people estimated to have been displaced within the Tigray, Amhara and Afar regions. Many households are facing critical conditions that threaten their livelihoods, their homes are damaged and looted, and they have limited (or no) access to functioning markets and basic services such as education and health care. The security situation in the region is highly erratic and unpredictable. The functioning of markets, banking, transport and telecommunication services is limited and humanitarian assistance is also hampered by the Ethiopian government, which limits the access to the region.

The project will focus on re-establishing access to safe water, including hygiene promotion to prevent disease outbreaks. Project activities will include rehabilitation of water supply systems and provision of necessary sanitation supplies to target households. The project will also aim to improve food security for which cash assistance will be provided to the target households.

Multisectoral life-saving response to the acute needs of the most vulnerable IDPs and returnees in Oromiya and SNNP regions

Multisectoral life-saving response to the acute needs of the most vulnerable IDPs and returnees in Oromiya and SNNP regions

Ethnic conflicts, political unrest in the country, including armed struggles, and torrential rains alternating with devastating droughts have led to the displacement of hundreds of thousands of people in the Oromia and SNNPR regions over the past few years. In some cases, displaced people travel more than 100 km before finding a new safer place to live. Such displaced households often do not have their most basic needs met, such as access to drinking water, sanitation and hygiene, or safe shelter, and have not been able to grow or harvest crops (whether

due to unrest or natural disasters), leading to starvation. In areas of ethnic and political conflict, the security situation is very unstable and does not allow for the return of displaced families, but in some areas, People in Need also works with households that have already returned to their original homes and have to rebuild their dwellings and livelihoods.

The aim of this project is to help displaced households and returnees meet their most acute needs for access to safe drinking water, sanitation and dignified and safe shelter. The project activities provide emergency shelter kits including mattresses and blankets, emergency cooking kits for food preparation and hygiene items to the targeted households. The project also works with and trains local health workers and volunteers, who then spread awareness in the communities about good hygiene and prevention of infectious disease outbreaks. Finally, the project also focuses on the construction or rehabilitation of wells and water supply schemes. In total, the project will support approximately 216,000 people who are living in complex and protracted crises and do not have the means to meet their most basic needs.

Multisectoral life-saving response to the acute needs of the most vulnerable IDPs and returnees in Guji and West Guji zones, Oromia, Ethiopia

Multisectoral life-saving response to the acute needs of the most vulnerable IDPs and returnees in Guji and West Guji zones, Oromia, Ethiopia

Political instability and ethnic armed conflicts in neighboring areas over the past few years have displaced some 100,000 people seeking safety in the woredas of the Guji Zone. People fleeing violence often have to travel hundreds of kilometers leaving their agricultural land and possessions behind. Refugees in host communities often make up the same proportion as host community, putting more pressure on land. With a growing population, access to drinking water is becoming insufficient. People have to walk several kilometers for water from rivers and ponds which is not

properly cleaned. Thus, diseases related to poor hygiene are spreading in the area. Extensive droughts can threaten even these last sources of water within a few months. Refugees come without any possessions, they live in shelters in places that do not provide them with basic protection or minimal hygienic conditions.

People in Need is improving the living conditions of the internally displaced population by accessing drinking water and providing a safe shelter. Thanks to the project, the wells, latrines, and hand washes will be reconstructed, a water storage system will be introduced and staff will be trained for its administration and maintenance. Households will be equipped with basic hygiene kits and trained in their use while receiving equipment for simple shelters. Health volunteers will be in regular contact with households, so the key health and hygiene information will reach a wide range of community members. The project also includes an information campaign on the prevention, symptoms, and treatment of the Covid-19 viral disease.

Multisectoral life-saving response to the acute needs of the most vulnerable IDPs and returnees in Guji and West Guji zones, Oromia, Ethiopia

Multisectoral life-saving response to the acute needs of the most vulnerable IDPs and returnees in Guji and West Guji zones, Oromia, Ethiopia

Political instability and ethnic armed conflicts in neighboring areas over the past few years have displaced some 100,000 people seeking safety in the woredas of the Guji Zone. People fleeing violence often have to travel hundreds of kilometers leaving their agricultural land and possessions behind. Refugees in host communities often make up the same proportion as host community, putting more pressure on land. With a growing population, access to drinking water is becoming insufficient. People have to walk several kilometers for water from rivers and ponds which is not

properly cleaned. Thus, diseases related to poor hygiene are spreading in the area. Extensive droughts can threaten even these last sources of water within a few months. Refugees come without any possessions, they live in shelters in places that do not provide them with basic protection or minimal hygienic conditions.

People in Need is improving the living conditions of the internally displaced population by accessing drinking water and providing a safe shelter. Thanks to the project, the wells, latrines, and hand washes will be reconstructed, a water storage system will be introduced and staff will be trained for its administration and maintenance. Households will be equipped with basic hygiene kits and trained in their use while receiving equipment for simple shelters. Health volunteers will be in regular contact with households, so the key health and hygiene information will reach a wide range of community members. The project also includes an information campaign on the prevention, symptoms, and treatment of the Covid-19 viral disease.

Prevention and mitigation of COVID-19 spread among the most vulnerable population in Gedeo

Prevention and mitigation of COVID-19 spread among the most vulnerable population in Gedeo

The project focuses on preventing and mitigating the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic on the population in two zones (Gedeo and West Guji). Both zones have long struggled with the consequences of conflicts and political instability in the region, which have displaced hundreds of thousands of people. Difficult living conditions are exacerbated by alternating climatic conditions, with widespread floods destroying temporary shelters and long periods of drought preventing agricultural production. Due to the dysfunctional supply of drinking water, some woredas do not have access to safe water, which has an impact on the spreading of diseases. Gedeo and West Guji are characterized by a high density of population, inadequate hygiene conditions, and limited quality of health care. Hospitals often lack access to clean water, which poses an unprecedented risk in the context of a global pandemic.
People in Need focuses primarily on improving access to health care, the quality of care, the hygiene standards, and awareness of good hygiene practices within communities. Medical centers will be equipped with hand-washing facilities and water infrastructure. Healthcare professionals will receive training in the prevention, identification, and treatment of Covid-19. Health volunteers who regularly visit communities will be trained in proper hygiene, prevention, identification, and treatment of Covid-19 so that key information reaches as many people as possible. The distribution of hygiene kits to households will be linked to an awareness campaign focused on good hygiene practices. Awareness will be further shared through leaflets and posters in public places.
 
Assistance to internally displaced people in Gedeo

Assistance to internally displaced people in Gedeo

People in Need is implementing two humanitarian projects to help internally displaced people  in Gedeo; one is funded by the ECHO donor, the OCHA donor is the other. Both projects are focused on making basic human needs available, such as access to drinkable water, basic hygiene aids and cooking and eating aids, as well as simple shelter.
Assistance to drought-affected areas

Assistance to drought-affected areas

In mid-2017, People in Need in Ethiopia went on to fight the drought to South Omo. Water boreholes are being repaired, water is imported to the most needy areas in tanks, where there are no roads, on donkeys. PIN's Partner, Veterinarians Without Borders, is dedicated to destitute cattle for the most affected households.

Assistance in areas affected by epidemics

Assistance in areas affected by epidemics

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Support of Somali refugees

Support of Somali refugees

PIN began its reconstruction efforts in the Somali region in 2010. In July 2011, the organization launched a comprehensive relief operation to save the lives of thousands of people fleeing the famine in Somali to the Southeast Ethiopia. In Ethiopia alone over 4.5 million people suffered from droughts and food shortages, mainly in the North and the South of the country. In the Godere region beside the Ethiopian - Somali border, PIN provided assistance for about 15,000 people (circa 2,300 families) the majority of whom were women and children.  From August 2011 to early February 2012, PIN provided basic food and nutrition, launched six wells that enabled access to drinking water.
    
Through PIN projects there was realized the installation of dozens of new latrines, volunteers’ training took place and hygienic conditions rapidly improved. Furthermore, PIN provided material and tools for the construction of shelters, which were later equipped with utensils and hygiene kits containing soaps or water purification tablets. Thanks to the two mobile ambulances our operatives managed to provide basic health care. In addition, the old shelter building was converted into the school, which serves now as both, a study room and a dining facility.
Immediate assistance to victims of natural disasters

Immediate assistance to victims of natural disasters

In 2008 a serious crisis in Ethiopia occurred, due to a long drought, which led to the depletion of food stocks, extensive malnutrition, lack of drinking water and the spread of infectious diseases. The Alaba district was one of the most affected areas. In the Alaba area PIN provided first aid in the form of medicines, tents, mattresses, disinfectants and other hygiene material for treating malnourished children and pregnant women. 

In the next phase, PIN focused on repair of water well, building of two health centres and construction of water distribution systems. In addition to the nine existing wells being repaired, seven water distribution systems, thirty two roof rainwater collectors and fifteen latrines around schools and health centres were constructed. PIN’s development assistance project also included an extensive educational campaign, part of which was a demonstration of hygiene habits and distribution of canisters of water and soap. Overall this project benefitted circa 118 000 inhabitants of the Alaba district.
        
Poorly accessible areas of the Southern Oma in the Region of Southern Nations were in 2010 badly affected by floods, which lead to the expansion of waterborne diseases, including cholera. Given the fact, that even under the normal circumstances in the (Oma) region only 40% of the population has access to basic care, PIN immediately, after securing funding, went to distribute water purification tablets, water filters and hygiene kits. Following this emergency phase of assistance, nine wells were repaired and cleaned and nine roof rainwater collectors were built.  The project was also an educational campaign for better hygiene habits and active public health training and helped more than 36 000 people.

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